Hmong WoW: Tshuab Hlwb Hlau

The Hmong Word of the Week is “tshuab hlwb hlau.”

This is a Hmong word for “computer.” It is a made-up word based on the idea behind “computer.” Translated literally, it means “machine brain metal,” or “metal brain machine,” for the adjective follows the noun, or noun clause, in Hmong. It takes the classifier “lub.”

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Hmong WoW: Noj Tsiab Peb Caug

The Hmong “Word of the Week” is “Noj Tsiab Peb Caug.”

Obviously, this is not just one word, but it is one idea. It means “to celebrate New Year’s,” but literally translated, it would be “to eat the New Year’s feast.” “Noj” is “to eat,” “Tsiab” is the feast, and “peb caug,” which means “thirty,” refers to the 30th day of the lunar month after completing the rice harvest. That day is considered to be the last day of the old year and the beginning of the new.

Hmong Girls at New Year's, by John Pavelka
Hmong Girls at New Year’s, by John Pavelka

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Announcing the “Hmong Word of the Week”

One of the goals of this website is to promote the knowledge of Hmong culture through blog posts and fiction. It’s fitting, then, that I bring in a bit of Hmong language learning.

From 2004 to 2012, I taught a Hmong Culture class at BYU. It was designed to allow those students who had learned Hmong during their missionary service to get language credit toward graduation. I structured the class so that we covered Hmong History, Hmong folktales, and the Hmong funeral chant “Tell the Way,” or Qhuab Ke. I also threw in remedial vocabulary sessions to help the students learn Hmong words they didn’t know yet.

Why would you want to learn any Hmong? You could argue that it’s a dying language and culture, and that compared to other languages you could learn, there isn’t much benefit to knowing it. And you may be right.

On the other hand, the Hmong in America are nearly half a million strong now. They live in every state in the Union, with the main concentrations in California, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Carolina. Outside America, the Hmong live in many countries, including Southern China, Northern Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Australia, France, and French Guyana. And, as more and more generations of Hmong in the Diaspora (the lands where a refugee population has settled) adopt the language and culture of their host countries, the need becomes greater to remember the language and the cultural connotations around that language, so that a part of Hmong identity may be preserved.

Besides, wouldn’t it be nice to know a few Hmong words when you happen to meet a Hmong?

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